Using Hypnosis To Explore Pleasure

Hypnosis is an incredible tool. It can be used to accomplish all manner of things and its scope and potential should never be underestimated.  As I regularly remind my clients, the only limit to what’s possible with hypnosis is your imagination.  It’s a substantial claim, but one that I ceaselessly enjoy demonstrating.

Different people choose to explore hypnosis for different reasons.  Some are curious about the trance experience in and of itself, whilst for others trance is a vehicle which they intend to utilise to explore other desires.

There is no right or wrong way to use/explore hypnosis, but for the purposes of this blog I am going to focus on the utilisation of hypnosis (yes I used an “s” and not a “z” – I’m British) for pleasure.  Pleasure is, after all, a big draw for many (understandably) and it is also my specific area of expertise.

If you’ve paid careful attention to the homepage of my website you’ve probably noticed the tagline “I can make all your fantasies come true”. Many assume it’s simply a marketing ploy, but the reality is far more exciting.  The reality is that I mean every word, as many of my clients have already discovered to their utter delight and after having successfully overcome their initial disbelief.

Pleasure is powerful. Inspirational. I’m sure you’ve felt that deep, intense craving for a particular kind of pleasure before, haven’t you?  At times it sneaks up on you…at other times it speaks to a more enduring, aching longing…that need and desire for pleasure is always with us, and hypnosis offers a powerful means to fully explore the myriad of possibilities and opportunities that exist.

After all – pleasure means different things to different people. Yes, erotic pleasure is one very exquisite option, but there are others…the tranquil, blissful and serene sensation that comes with surrendering to trance (and is so often overlooked)…the pleasure that comes from being able to quieten an anxious mind and deeply relax a tense body…the options for indulgence are many and varied, as are the levels of intensity that can be explored and played with (ask me about my numbers triggers the next time you enjoy a session with me and you’ll see what I mean).

You can use hypnosis to explore familiar pleasures and discover new ones…to push boundaries and stretch your comfort zone and in doing so allow yourself to become open to a world of new possibilities. The anticipation and reward of new discoveries are in and of themselves pleasurable as well as the pleasure of the discoveries themselves.

Pleasure can be compounded in hypnosis…have you ever been able to explore what it feels like to enjoy multiple different yet simultaneous kinds of pleasure?  Well, now you can. Now it can be your reality.  Soft, gentle, intense, aching, decadent pleasure…all within your grasp when you trance.  Who wouldn’t want that?  Hmm?

But what if you’ve already tried to trance but struggled?  Does this mean that you’re somehow cut off from the opportunity to indulge in the pleasures I have been talking about? Of course not!  Many of my existing clients previously struggled to trance before they sought me out.  Today they are my walking success stories and repeated proof that with the right guidance and understanding, almost anyone can achieve trance easily.

The key to success is finding a hypnotist whose style works well with your abilities (because you most certainly are able) and the willingness to invest in the opportunity.  Some clients have found my mp3’s alone have worked for them, whereas for others success came after enjoying a live session with me.  There is no right or wrong – only what works for you.

The journey toward exploring pleasure begins with a single step…take it.

 

My mp3 store: https://www.queenofdreamshypnosis.com/mp3-store/

 

Live sessions: https://www.queenofdreamshypnosis.com/live-sessions/

 

Leveraging your analytical gifts to achieve successful hypnotic trance

I am a firm believer that analytical people make some of the best hypnosis subjects. I completely dispute the frustratingly pervasive assumption peddled by far too many hypnotists that analytical people are “bad” or “difficult” subjects because in my (many years of) experience this simply isn’t true.

I have had the pleasure of hypnotizing countless people and nothing brings me more joy than working with an analytical subject because right from the get-go I know that they are going to be amazing to work with.

How do I know this? Because analytical people are blessed with an incredible, often untapped and underappreciated gift. Their gift is that which far too many hypnotists incorrectly malign – the ability to analyse.

I don’t know how, when or where the assumption arose that analysing one’s trance experience is a negative thing and not to be encouraged but I do know that it’s utter nonsense. Yes, many people respond well to being told to “relax and not think”. It gives them permission to switch their mind off and focus on what the hypnotist is saying.

But that technique isn’t a catch all. It doesn’t work for everyone. If you’re analytical, being told to “relax and not think” often leads to the opposite effects (am I relaxed enough? How do I not think? I’m thinking about not thinking! type thoughts). This in turn leads to distraction and frustration and the (totally wrong) assumption that trance is at best difficult and at worst impossible for analytical people.

But what would happen if the subject was given permission to analyse? To be told that it is okay to explore and think about their trance experience as they are experiencing it? What if the hypnotist could gently guide the subject’s focus without imposing rigid rules around relaxation and not thinking? What if a more flexible approach was encouraged and more appropriate support offered to the subject by the hypnotist?

Well, I can tell you from my own experience (and I have chosen to specialise in working with analytical and so-called “difficult” subjects so that should tell you something) that this is when the magic happens.

Giving the subject permission to leverage their analytical abilities and appreciate them for the gift they are rather than a problematic hindrance transforms the hypnotic trance experience from one of stress and worry (will I be able to trance? Is it working? Am I doing it right?) To one of confidence, positivity and self-assurance (Yes, I notice that. Yes, I feel how that sensation has evolved, etc).

By allowing a subject to utilise their innate analytical gifts, and appropriately supporting them in doing so, they (the subject) are able to engage more deeply with the hypnosis experience. The result is that they trance faster and deeper than the average person. Because they are able to self-verify more quickly than the average person how their trance is evolving, they progress at a faster pace and enjoy a more profound hypnotic trance experience.

This is how the magic happens – encourage a subject to utilise and engage with the tools and gifts they already possess rather than trying to suppress them and they come alive. I have seen it time and time again, and the more they experience this, the more confident in themselves and their abilities they become and the more effective the trance experience becomes.

Success is often contingent on the support of an experienced hypnotist with experience of supporting analytical people which is why I constantly recommend people do their research, but the ability itself of a person to achieve trance does not lie with the hypnotist – it lies with the subject. The hypnotist’s job is simply to guide and support the subject and allow them to achieve their true potential.

I promise you – if you are analytical, you are a gifted hypnosis subject. If you’ve struggled to succeed so far that is not your fault in any way, shape or form. Different people learn in different ways. Once you find a method that works for you, you will be able to achieve things you never even imagined.

So – now you’re aware of the potential that lies inside of you, how do you get started?

I typically recommend live sessions over mp3s initially as in my experience this is a good way to lay the groundwork, create a solid base to build upon and allows the hypnotist to tailor the experience specifically to you.  Some hypnotists offer in-person sessions whilst others, such as myself, offer remote video sessions (see my Live Sessions page for more information). I don’t believe that one is better than the other – if anything video sessions offer more flexibility and choice as you don’t have to travel, plus are just as effective as in person sessions. Ultimately, it comes down to what you’re comfortable with and what the hypnotist you’ve chosen to work with offers.

Remember – You need invest in yourself and appreciate your worth. Take your time, find a hypnotist whose style works for you and enjoy the journey!

The Importance of Ethics In Hypnosis (***TRIGGER WARNING***)

***trigger warning: this blog contains details relating to inappropriate triggers used on a minor***

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Those of you who know me know how I pride myself on my ethics, especially when it comes to hypnosis. It is very important to me that my clients know and feel safe with me. That they understand that their well-being is my priority.

Recently someone added a comment to a blog I wrote. I didn’t feel that the comment was appropriate to allow in response to the blog itself due to potentially triggering content, but I have included it below as an illustration of why ethics are so, so important in hypnosis (I should add that the story below is essentially “hearsay” as I have no way to independently verify what the original author has claimed occurred):

At a stage show a couple of years ago at the Hypnothoughts Live conference in Las Vegas, a 15-year old girl was among the participants. She was implanted with a trigger that when her shoulder was touched, she would orgasm. After the show, people (men) kept coming up to her and touching her shoulder – it was VERY distressing to both the girl and her mother, who was present.

This should have been a NO-NO! It was highly improper and unethical, on the part of the hypnotist, especially with a minor and not to have removed the suggestion!”

It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out why the above behaviour is incredibly inappropriate and that in itself makes the alleged event even more dismaying. It is so obviously, blatantly unethical and downright predatory – not only of the hypnotist but the men who chose subsequently to take advantage. The fact that the individual in question was also a minor makes what transpired even more heinous.

I simply cannot emphasize enough how important ethics is in hypnosis. Your hypnotist should make you feel safe and confident in their abilities as well as satisfied that they are placing a significant emphasis on your well-being. Trust your gut. If something feels “off”, even if you can’t put that feeling into words, you do not need to proceed. If you are in trance and the hypnotist suggests something that you are not comfortable with, you are not obliged to follow through. What will most likely happen is that you will snap out of trance at which point you can verbally object to the hypnotists suggestion. If the suggestion you were uncomfortable with wasn’t a deliberate ploy on the hypnotists part then they should be able to calmly talk through with you what happened and why, take this in to account and be mindful moving forward. They shouldn’t ask or encourage you to trance again until you feel comfortable and confident to do so. If the suggestion was deliberate (sadly bad, unethical hypnotists do exist as the above story illustrates) then you have the option to walk away altogether.

I think part of the problem is that people feel that once they are in trance they lose all control and feel as if they have to follow through with triggers and commands, even if they are not comfortable with them. This is simply not true. You always have a choice. It doesn’t matter how deeply you are tranced. If this is an area of concern for you then I would recommend listening to a free mp3s I have – “Art of Control”. If it makes it easier for you, listen through the first time without trancing to make sure you’re comfortable with the content.  Doing this won’t prevent you from being able to achieve and enjoy trancing to this recording when you are ready to.

If you are a hypnotist reading this – please be mindful of ethics and ethical implications of what you’re doing and/or want to do. Your subject is placing their trust in you. Please don’t abuse it. Your subjects physical and mental well-being should be your top priority.

 

Thoughts? Comments? Please share below.

You don’t need to use confusion inductions to hypnotise analytical subjects

This blog post evolved into a direction that is mainly aimed at helping hypnotists understand why confusion inductions are not always necessary – or indeed appropriate – for trancing analytical subjects, but I hope hypnosis subjects also find the information useful/insightful. If, after reading, you have any questions or thoughts please leave comments below. Thank you!

 

Speak to your average hypnotist about analytical people and you tend to get one or a variety of the following comments: that they’re “bad” or “difficult” subjects and that the only way you can successfully trance them is with the use of confusion inductions.

 

Those comments? They’re all absolute rubbish. Those of you who know me know that I absolutely love working with analytical subjects and years of hypnosis experience has consistently shown me how amazing and capable analytical subjects can be. I have written plenty of blog posts on the subject to date.

 

In my many years (going on for a decade now) of being a hypnotist I also rarely use confusion inductions and yet have successfully hypnotised hundreds (I stopped counting years ago) of analytical subjects. How do I achieve that? Why do I go against the widely held/accepted belief that confusion inductions are the only reliable way to hypnotise analytical subjects?

 

Well, again, to be blunt – because it’s nonsense. Confusion inductions can be useful for trancing analytical people but so can many others. It’s most certainly not the only way to successfully trance analytical subjects. Far from it!

 

So – why don’t I tend to use confusion inductions if they are so popular? The main reason is that analytical people are usually also dealing with varying degrees of anxiety and confusion inductions can be overwhelming and/or uncomfortable in such situations. Of course some subjects will really enjoy confusion inductions but to me they often feel like beating the conscious mind into submission by overwhelming the mind of a subject who, if analytical is likely already prone to overthinking. Sending an overthinking brain into meltdown isn’t the most pleasurable way of inducing trance and as pleasure is a priority for me, I tend to turn to other ways of inducing trance.

 

This brings us to the million dollar question – how exactly do I trance analytical subjects? Unfortunately there is no clear cut simple answer as I tailor every induction to the individual subject but I can offer some general pointers. Firstly, and I cannot emphasize this enough the pre talk is important. I’m generalizing here but for the most part, analytical subjects like structure. They like to know what to expect. And even if it’s not “necessary” it’s good practice in general for all kinds of subjects to prepare them and let them know what will happen as well as dispelling some common myths (e.g. the myth that trance is like sleep to give one example).  If the subject has an idea of what to expect then it helps to keep them focused and their mind is less likely to wander.

 

Secondly, never tell an analytical subject to “relax” and “not think about anything”. That is one of the worst things you can say to an analytical subject. It’s akin to telling someone not to think of a pink elephant. What’s the first thing you think about?

 

Finally, it’s okay if analytical people want to analyse their trance experience. Doing so won’t distract them or hinder the process in any way (assuming of course the hypnotist is competent and used to working with analytical subjects).

 

There are many different types of inductions you can use, and there’s no “one size fits all” approach. The induction is less important than the subject and what they need to enjoy a successful trance. If you go into a session determined to use a particular induction then you’re limiting your success rate (and potentially traumatizing the subject) whereas if you go in with an open mind, speak with your subject/client about what they need (they may not know how to articulate it, but again, a competent, experienced hypnotist will know what questions to ask to get the answers they need) then your success rate potentially skyrockets as you’re tailoring the induction to your client, and not trying to force your client to engage in a particular induction.

 

As I said before, some clients will respond well to confusion inductions and I am not dismissing such inductions out of hand. They remain a potentially fun and useful tools (I use confusion inductions with some of my regular clients for fun because I know how to do so in a more light-hearted way and I also know they trust me). What I am suggesting is that confusion inductions are not a blunt tool that can/should be applied to all analytical subjects. Get creative, have fun with inductions, experiment and learn to tailor your approach as a hypnotist to what your client actually needs, not what you assume they need.