How Long Do Triggers Last?

This is somewhat of a “how long is a piece of string?” question as there are many factors that can affect how long the effects of a trigger last.

Some of these can include:

  • The skill of the hypnotist who implants the trigger
  • The willingness of the subject to accept the trigger/how comfortable they are with the trigger
  • How easily the trigger can be integrated into day to day life (e.g. if it is simple/beneficial and can be used regularly then it may well last longer than a strongly sexual trigger that the subject is not entirely sure about and can only be used in very particular situations.

Personally speaking I have one hypnosis subject who I tranced many years ago (before becoming professional). I gave him a fun trigger to have a pleasurable response upon seeing a particular candy bar. Years later (approx 2-3 years after I had ceased hypnotising him ) he sent me a message to say that the trigger was still as effective as ever.  More recently I have had clients come to me for a live session after a lapse of a few months and been surprised at how effective the triggers I gave them in previous session/s still are.

As a hypnotist, if you want a trigger to be effective and to last then you need the clients subconscious to be on board with what you’re asking – after all, it will be the subconscious mind who will be implementing the response to the trigger.

Firstly, keep the trigger simple – don’t make it overly complex or with multiple steps to take effect. Simple is effective and easy to implement.  Secondly, allow the trigger to be pleasurable. We all want to enjoy pleasure, right? So give your subject a new opportunity to enjoy pleasure with the trigger. This can be sexual or non-sexual pleasure (there’s a myriad of different types of pleasure you can make use of), but if you are aiming for sexual pleasure for the love of god think very carefully about when/how the trigger will be implemented.  You don’t want your subject to be accidentally triggered at an inappropriate moment.  This is one of the reasons why almost all the triggers I give my subjects only work when I say them. For those that aren’t, I ensure that I word the instructions for the trigger in such a way that there is no way they will cause problems and/or embarrassment. Typically a statement along the lines of the client enjoying the trigger only when appropriate to do so. If saying something like this make sure that you have a good understanding of what the client considers to be appropriate. If in doubt, don’t give them the trigger.

 

How Effective is Text Hypnosis?

There are countless ways to hypnotise someone – in person, over the phone, live video (like Skype)…and then there is hypnosis over text. Many people seem to be especially suspicious of text hypnosis and I regularly get asked if it is effective. Now you have your answer:

Text trance can be just as effective as any other form of trancing but it does require a skilled and experienced hypnotist if it is to be carried out effectively.

The hypnotist can’t rely on visual cues over test so the hypnotist is essentially “working blind” from that perspective. Personally speaking I compensate for this by relying on my extensive experience – you get a feel for what stage people are at based partly on general experience and partly on how they respond. It’s a mix of experience, intuition and knowing what questions to ask to work out where things are at and what needs to be done to develop/monitor the trance state.

If a subject is capable of following simple instructions and being honest about what they are experiencing then text trance should be successful, especially in the hands of a skilled hypnotist.

Text hypnosis is a “different” experience to other types of hypnotic induction but is equally effective and you can still experience and enjoy deep trance.

This type of induction works even if you are skeptical. I have hypnotised plenty of people who weren’t sure if it would work – they still tranced deeply for me.

I initially added text hypnosis to my site as a temporary measure when I was moving and unable to offer video sessions. The plan was to remove the option for text hypnosis sessions once I had settled, but they proved to be so popular that I decided to leave them as an option.

I do have some testimonials for text hypnosis sessions on my “Testimonials” page which are worth taking a look at if you are curious.

Any thoughts, comments, questions? Please share them below.

The Importance of Ethics In Hypnosis (***TRIGGER WARNING***)

***trigger warning: this blog contains details relating to inappropriate triggers used on a minor***

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Those of you who know me know how I pride myself on my ethics, especially when it comes to hypnosis. It is very important to me that my clients know and feel safe with me. That they understand that their well-being is my priority.

Recently someone added a comment to a blog I wrote. I didn’t feel that the comment was appropriate to allow in response to the blog itself due to potentially triggering content, but I have included it below as an illustration of why ethics are so, so important in hypnosis (I should add that the story below is essentially “hearsay” as I have no way to independently verify what the original author has claimed occurred):

At a stage show a couple of years ago at the Hypnothoughts Live conference in Las Vegas, a 15-year old girl was among the participants. She was implanted with a trigger that when her shoulder was touched, she would orgasm. After the show, people (men) kept coming up to her and touching her shoulder – it was VERY distressing to both the girl and her mother, who was present.

This should have been a NO-NO! It was highly improper and unethical, on the part of the hypnotist, especially with a minor and not to have removed the suggestion!”

It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out why the above behaviour is incredibly inappropriate and that in itself makes the alleged event even more dismaying. It is so obviously, blatantly unethical and downright predatory – not only of the hypnotist but the men who chose subsequently to take advantage. The fact that the individual in question was also a minor makes what transpired even more heinous.

I simply cannot emphasize enough how important ethics is in hypnosis. Your hypnotist should make you feel safe and confident in their abilities as well as satisfied that they are placing a significant emphasis on your well-being. Trust your gut. If something feels “off”, even if you can’t put that feeling into words, you do not need to proceed. If you are in trance and the hypnotist suggests something that you are not comfortable with, you are not obliged to follow through. What will most likely happen is that you will snap out of trance at which point you can verbally object to the hypnotists suggestion. If the suggestion you were uncomfortable with wasn’t a deliberate ploy on the hypnotists part then they should be able to calmly talk through with you what happened and why, take this in to account and be mindful moving forward. They shouldn’t ask or encourage you to trance again until you feel comfortable and confident to do so. If the suggestion was deliberate (sadly bad, unethical hypnotists do exist as the above story illustrates) then you have the option to walk away altogether.

I think part of the problem is that people feel that once they are in trance they lose all control and feel as if they have to follow through with triggers and commands, even if they are not comfortable with them. This is simply not true. You always have a choice. It doesn’t matter how deeply you are tranced. If this is an area of concern for you then I would recommend listening to a free mp3s I have – “Art of Control”. If it makes it easier for you, listen through the first time without trancing to make sure you’re comfortable with the content.  Doing this won’t prevent you from being able to achieve and enjoy trancing to this recording when you are ready to.

If you are a hypnotist reading this – please be mindful of ethics and ethical implications of what you’re doing and/or want to do. Your subject is placing their trust in you. Please don’t abuse it. Your subjects physical and mental well-being should be your top priority.

 

Thoughts? Comments? Please share below.

Why Stage Hypnosis Is Like Porn

We’ve all seen those stage hypnosis shows where people seem to be tranced instantly and deeply with just a single word and made to do all sorts of weird and wonderful things. Looks impressive, doesn’t it?

Of course, what they don’t tell you is that the subjects are either faking it or have been carefully selected by the hypnotist because they are naturally highly susceptible to suggestion. Stage hypnosis is like the porn of the hypnosis world – showy and overhyped. Yes it *could* happen in normal day to day life but the odds are astronomical. hypnosis can be “real” but that doesn’t necessarily make it realistic.

Full disclosure – I am not a big fan of stage hypnosis (I know, surprising, right? Haha). I find it’s often exploitative and the potential lack of consent makes me uncomfortable (for those rare somnambulists who are exceptionally susceptible to trance they may not be able to consciously consent to the request to go up on stage, for example).

Stage hypnosis, like porn, has its place. It’s showy and entertaining. It can be exciting to watch, sure, but it can also give unrealistic expectations of what to expect, which can be very unhelpful when trying to achieve your goal.

Just as there are arguments to be made that porn leaves open the door for unrealistic expectations of how men and women should behave and what sex should look/feel like, stage hypnosis does the same. It makes it look as if everyone should be able to trance instantly, that hypnosis is big and showy and dramatic.

More negatively, it can also scare people. They may be worried that they would/could be made to embarrass themselves and/or be forced to do something that they are not comfortable with. This is not true, but if you don’t understand hypnosis and how it works and stage hypnosis is your only experience then it is easy for incorrect inferences to be made.

To use a porn parallel, I’ve heard it said that porn gives women an unrealistic expectation of how quickly a plumber will attend a call out and come to their house. Likewise if watching porn is your only experience of sex you’re going to have a pretty warped view of how things should play out.

Porn and stage hypnosis are entertainment. They can be fun and enjoyable but they don’t accurately reflect the depth of potential and possibilities that exist, nor the richness of the actual reality.

If not appreciated for the entertainment they are then both can also lead to unrealistic expectations which can have negative impacts and knock-on effects.

Having said all that, this doesn’t mean that what you see in stage hypnosis isn’t achievable. Given time and a hypnotist you trust many of the triggers, etc, you see played out on stage can be recreated and enjoyed. What’s important is to realise that this doesn’t happen instantly. You need to learn to run before you can walk, so enjoy the journey and enjoy the entertainment for what it is.

You don’t need to use confusion inductions to hypnotise analytical subjects

This blog post evolved into a direction that is mainly aimed at helping hypnotists understand why confusion inductions are not always necessary – or indeed appropriate – for trancing analytical subjects, but I hope hypnosis subjects also find the information useful/insightful. If, after reading, you have any questions or thoughts please leave comments below. Thank you!

 

Speak to your average hypnotist about analytical people and you tend to get one or a variety of the following comments: that they’re “bad” or “difficult” subjects and that the only way you can successfully trance them is with the use of confusion inductions.

 

Those comments? They’re all absolute rubbish. Those of you who know me know that I absolutely love working with analytical subjects and years of hypnosis experience has consistently shown me how amazing and capable analytical subjects can be. I have written plenty of blog posts on the subject to date.

 

In my many years (going on for a decade now) of being a hypnotist I also rarely use confusion inductions and yet have successfully hypnotised hundreds (I stopped counting years ago) of analytical subjects. How do I achieve that? Why do I go against the widely held/accepted belief that confusion inductions are the only reliable way to hypnotise analytical subjects?

 

Well, again, to be blunt – because it’s nonsense. Confusion inductions can be useful for trancing analytical people but so can many others. It’s most certainly not the only way to successfully trance analytical subjects. Far from it!

 

So – why don’t I tend to use confusion inductions if they are so popular? The main reason is that analytical people are usually also dealing with varying degrees of anxiety and confusion inductions can be overwhelming and/or uncomfortable in such situations. Of course some subjects will really enjoy confusion inductions but to me they often feel like beating the conscious mind into submission by overwhelming the mind of a subject who, if analytical is likely already prone to overthinking. Sending an overthinking brain into meltdown isn’t the most pleasurable way of inducing trance and as pleasure is a priority for me, I tend to turn to other ways of inducing trance.

 

This brings us to the million dollar question – how exactly do I trance analytical subjects? Unfortunately there is no clear cut simple answer as I tailor every induction to the individual subject but I can offer some general pointers. Firstly, and I cannot emphasize this enough the pre talk is important. I’m generalizing here but for the most part, analytical subjects like structure. They like to know what to expect. And even if it’s not “necessary” it’s good practice in general for all kinds of subjects to prepare them and let them know what will happen as well as dispelling some common myths (e.g. the myth that trance is like sleep to give one example).  If the subject has an idea of what to expect then it helps to keep them focused and their mind is less likely to wander.

 

Secondly, never tell an analytical subject to “relax” and “not think about anything”. That is one of the worst things you can say to an analytical subject. It’s akin to telling someone not to think of a pink elephant. What’s the first thing you think about?

 

Finally, it’s okay if analytical people want to analyse their trance experience. Doing so won’t distract them or hinder the process in any way (assuming of course the hypnotist is competent and used to working with analytical subjects).

 

There are many different types of inductions you can use, and there’s no “one size fits all” approach. The induction is less important than the subject and what they need to enjoy a successful trance. If you go into a session determined to use a particular induction then you’re limiting your success rate (and potentially traumatizing the subject) whereas if you go in with an open mind, speak with your subject/client about what they need (they may not know how to articulate it, but again, a competent, experienced hypnotist will know what questions to ask to get the answers they need) then your success rate potentially skyrockets as you’re tailoring the induction to your client, and not trying to force your client to engage in a particular induction.

 

As I said before, some clients will respond well to confusion inductions and I am not dismissing such inductions out of hand. They remain a potentially fun and useful tools (I use confusion inductions with some of my regular clients for fun because I know how to do so in a more light-hearted way and I also know they trust me). What I am suggesting is that confusion inductions are not a blunt tool that can/should be applied to all analytical subjects. Get creative, have fun with inductions, experiment and learn to tailor your approach as a hypnotist to what your client actually needs, not what you assume they need.